Rotary Club of Kerrville, Texas                  Chartered February 26, 1926                               District 5840

 
Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Kerrville!

Kerrville

Service Above Self

We meet Wednesdays at 11:45 AM
Inn of the Hills
1001 Junction Hwy
Kerrville, TX  78028-4913
United States
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Stories
Members of the Schreiner University Choir provided the entertainment with Christmas songs at last Wednesday's meeting. Led by director Michael Kahl, the students sang a number of favorites, including We Three Kings, God Rest You Merry Gentlemen, Feliz Navidad, Rudolf and Jingle Bells.
 
Several new Paul Harris fellows were honored at the meeting.
 
Lois Schlieiter, Jimmy Hutto (+2), Rosa Lavender (+2), Robin Miears (+3), Delmar Hiller (+1), John Forister (+2), Dave Rittenhouse (+3).
Two new Members joined our club last Wednesday. Cecil Atkission proposed Jeff Harris as a new member, and Jill Sadberry proposed Sherri Jones as a new member. Jeff is with Community First National Bank, and Sherri is with Republic Services.
Jeff Harris
 
 
Sherri Jones
Prayers go out to our President Kristy, who had a hip replaced last week. We hope for a speedy rehab and recovery.
Past Kerrville Rotary Club president Kenneth Early presided over the annual meeting last Wednesday where the upcoming year slate of officers was presented and approved by the membership.
 
The officers and directors are:
 
Robin Miears            President
Charlie Mcllvain      Vice President
Crystal Dockery        Secretary
Gena Carter                Treasurer
Tammy Prout            Director
Jeff Wendling            Director
Janelle Peralt         Director
Chris Chedzoy           Director
Tim Crenwelge          Director
Ingrid Painter            Director
 
Tivy High School's volleyball team joined us for the Wednesday meeting. They had a very successful year, winning several matches in the post season, and excelling in the classroom as well.
Our main fund raiser for the year, SuperBall, is scheduled for the day before the Superbowl, February 3, 2018. Mark your calendar and plan to purchase tickets and act as a sponsor for this exciting event!
 
Please see a list of our generous sponsors, updated as of 12/5/2017, below:
 
NFL Commissioner Level
  • James Avery
Owners Suite Level
  • Kerr County Abstract & Title Co.
Most Valuable Player Level
  • Massey Itschner & Company, P.C.
  • KPUB
  • Nationwide/Hill Country Community Journal
Season Ticket Holder Reserved Tables for 10 
  • Texas Hill Country Bank
  • Crenwelge Motors
  • Security State Bank & Trust
  • Wells Fargo
Cheering Section
  • Rob and Rebecca Poindexter
See the flyer and sponsorship form below:
Cliff Kaplan, Program Manager for the Hill Country Alliance, spoke to the group concerning the preservation of our night skies.
 
 
Cliff started his presentation by informing the club that four out of five people in this country have now lost their view of the Milky Way due to pervasive light pollution.  Light pollution is excessive and inappropriate artificial light.
 
The four components of light pollution are often combined and overlapping:
 
  • Urban sky glow—the brightening of the night sky over inhabited areas.
 
  • Light trespass—light falling where it is not intended, wanted, or needed.
 
  • Glare— excessive brightness which causes visual discomfort. High levels of glare can decrease visibility.
 
  • Clutter—bright, confusing, and excessive groupings of light sources, commonly found in over-lit urban areas. The proliferation of clutter contributes to urban sky glow, trespass, and glare.
 
This map shows the varying degrees of light pollution we face here in the Texas Hill Country:
 
 
The adverse effects of light pollution extend beyond the study of our night skies
  • New research suggests that light at night may interfere with normal circadian rhythms—the 24-hour cycle of day and night that humans have used to maintain health and regulate their activities for thousands of years. Light pollution has also been linked to sleep disorders, cancer, and other health issues.
  • Wildlife, too, is harmed by the unnecessary brightening of the night. From newly hatched sea turtles to migrating birds, fish, frogs, salamanders, and lighting bugs, artificial night lighting disrupts the cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. While research is still ongoing, it is becoming apparent that both bright days and dark nights are necessary to maintain healthy hormone production, cell function, and brain activity, as well as normal feeding, mating, and migratory behavior for many species.
  • Some communities have experienced a decrease in crime by reducing or eliminating nighttime lighting in appropriate areas. Our eyes, when dark-adapted, have good natural capacity in low-light situations. But when nightscapes are over-lit, eyes never have a chance to become dark-adapted, and areas adjacent to brightly lit areas become impenetrable, reducing safety. Over-lighting the night neither improves visibility nor increases nighttime safety, utility, security, or ambiance.
  • Light pollution wastes money and energy. Billions of dollars are spent on unnecessary lighting every year in the United States alone, with over $2.2 billion going directly into the nighttime sky via unshielded outdoor lights. The cost jumps to $3 billion (including $250M for Texas) when lost revenues from a decrease in tourism dollars are factored into the equation as well.  Astro Tourism is a rapidly growing industry in the Hill Country (families staying overnight typically spend 3/4 times more than they otherwise would on a day trip), and this is just one more reason we need to work to protect the integrity of our Hill Country skies.    
Practical actions we can take to reduce light pollution:
 
  • Use light only when and where it’s needed - Turn off lights when they are not needed and create a curfew for lights-out. Minimize interim light use with timers and motion detectors.
 
  • Use only as much light as needed. Over lighting reduces the eye’s ability to see outside of the lit area. In addition, excess light can produce glare, which also reduces visibility. Selecting the correct lamp wattage for your needs increases safety and reduces costs.
 
  • Shine lights down, not up. A well-designed fixture will direct the light where it’s needed most—at the ground. Select new fixtures that are fully shielded; retrofit or replace poor quality fixtures. For more information on selecting dark-sky friendly fixtures, refer to IDA’s Web site and the fixtures featured in the IDA Fixture Seal of Approval program.
 
  • Use efficient light sources for outdoor lighting around homes and businesses. Consider a compact fluorescent for good, energy efficient, economical lighting—a low-wattage lamp gives plenty of light for most properties and applications, and in a fully shielded fixture, it makes an excellent choice. When higher wattage lamps are necessary, be sure that they are fully shielded and energy efficient.
 
  • Learn the facts about light pollution - Learn how to recognize fixtures that are well-designed, dark sky friendly and efficient. IDA is the leading authority on the problems and solutions related to light pollution, and IDA’s Web site (www.darksky.org) is a great educational resource.
 
  • See illustrations below for examples of recommended lighting: 
 
Other ways we can protect our Hill Country Skies:
  • Through Education
    • Star Parties (i.e. Texas Night Sky Festival)
    • Schools (i.e. Schreiner Observatory) & Scouts
    • Public presentations and conferences
  • Night Sky Friendly Business Recognition Programs
 
 
  • Resolutions & Ordinances
    • Seven County Resolutions Adopted
      • Bandera, Blanco, Burnet, Kerr, Kimble, Real, Uvalde
 
  • Twelve Other Outdoor Lighting Ordinances Adopted
    • Blanco, Boerne, Bulverde, Fredericksburg, Llano, Mason, Horseshoe Bay, Johnson City, Kyle, Wimberley, Westlake Hills, San Antonio
  • Donate
    • Established in 1988, the International Dark-Sky Association is an educational, environmental 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to protecting and preserving the nighttime environment and our heritage of dark skies through quality outdoor lighting. With over thousands of members in more than 70 countries, IDA relies on contributions from concerned citizens like you who become members, donate, or make us a part of their planned giving portfolios.
 
Next Steps for the Kerrville Community:
  •  Deeper Dive & Action Planning Meeting
    • Thursday, January 11th, 7pm at the Riverside Nature Center, 150 Francisco Lemos St.
  • Develop Partnerships
    • Schreiner, Chamber of Commerce, City of Kerrville, KPUB, KISD, Retailers, Builders
Let's come together and protect our night skies!!

Rotary Satellite-Minutes Nov. 21, 2017

Call to Order/Welcome Tricia

Invocation Katie Muehlstein PLEDGE Tricia Byrom

Introductions - Guests-Kim Clarkson, Kristi Vandenberg (Noon Rotary) and Eddie Byrom

Guest Speaker- Samantha (Sam) Davidson Schreiner University Head Womens Basketball Coach

Program - Sam Davidson Schreiner University

Sam is the new head coach for SU Womens Basketball, she has 16 players and 11 are Freshman/Sophomore students. She enjoys being in Texas, but she did comment it was really hot here! Being from Tennessee she noted, she isnt the only one with an accent anymore! She is dynamite in a small package but comes with a great reputation for coaching having served under Hall of Fame Head coach for the University of Tennessee, Pat Summit.

She really didnt know a lot about Rotary what we do or who we are until she was called to speak at the Rotary meeting but agrees with and understands about giving back to the community. She always tries to implement with her team and they have helped with Hurricane Harvey by donating their time, supplies and by using their practice facility to house refugees. In addition, they have done a food drive and a bucket drive with cleaning supplies. They have plans to do an Angel tree and possibly do a Special Olympics tournament in the spring. Rotary President, Kristy, shared about the Rise against Hunger, being hosted by Rotary in March and encouraged Sam and her team to participate.

Sam did say Schreiner tries to recruit a different type of athlete, one who is enrolled based on SAT, ACT and GPA as well as class rank, versus athletic skills only. Recruit the academic first and encourage the student to be all they can be while being an athlete. This creates a varied mix of athletes but fosters a more rounded student.

More can be found out about Womens Basketball and head coach, Sam Davidson at Schreiners website, http://athletics.schreiner.edu/wbasketball/2017/roster/coach-davidson.aspx.

Club Business

  • Dec. 9th Blue Santa at Kerrville RV, sign up to work. Any questions, refer to Stephanie Skrumeda or Phyllis Ricks. We have additional monies budgeted and the suggestion was to give a ham as well as a turkey.
  • Dec. 19th - KSH Christmas Party sign up for gifts, beverages, etc. Try to be at KSH at 5:30. Jacque Duhr is cooking the meal and we are providing the entertainment for the patients.
  • Salvation Army Bell Ringing at Gibsons sign up at www.Kerrvilleyrotary.org
  • • Rotary Plant a Tree initiative, Kristy says we still have trees left, call Rick Martin before going to pick up, trees are $75 and you make check payable to Rotary
  • Paul Harris Fellowship, donate prior to year-end for recognition
  • Superball Tailgating extravaganza will be held Saturday, February 3rd, Kim Clarkson reminded us this is the annual fundraiser for Rotary and we provide college scholarships and funds to first responders. Other community service projects including Rise against hunger, Community picnic and the walk a fun event, we also used funds for the Blue Santa Program, Kerr County Junior District Livestock show and Literacy program for local elementary schools. There are opportunities to sponsor the event as well as buy a raffle ticket. Go to the events page at club runner for more information.
  • • We still have a few spots to fill for refreshments and prayer for our monthly meetings.
  • March 3rd, Rise Against Hunger, Hill Country Youth Event Center, Food drive and drop off a bag of groceries for the local food banks. Last year 20K meals went to Nicaragua.

Rotary Satellite-Minutes Nov. 21, 2017

Kristy reminded us about the new member committee made up of new members and a great way to foster new members to Rotary. There is money in the budget for a project the 2nd half of the Rotary year.

Dec. Meetings 12/19/2017 @5:30 Regular satellite meeting will be held at KSH for Patient party.

12/13/2017 Noon Rotary Christmas party Satellite invited, please RSVP

12/9/2017 Blue Santa

Closing - Four Way Tricia Byrom

 
 
 
Charlie Heuber President of Kiwanis Club of Kerrville opens the meeting and leads us in song.
 
 
Captain Beth Swyers lead us in Prayer
 

 
 
 
 Pledge of Allegiance
 
 
 
Kristi introduces the President of Morning Rotary Club Lew McCoy.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robin Miears            President
Charlie Mcllvain      Vice President
Crystal Dockery        Secretary
Gena Carter                Treasurer
Tammy Prout            Director
Jeff Windling            Director
Jennelle Peralt         Director
Chris Chedzoy           Director
Tim Crenwelge          Director
 
Mark McDaniel, City Manager, introduces Cliff Kaplan, Program Manager for the Hill Country Alliance, who spoke to the group concerning the preservation of our night skies.
 
 
Cliff started his presentation by informing the club that four out of five people in this country have now lost their view of the Milky Way due to pervasive light pollution.  Light pollution is excessive and inappropriate artificial light. The four components of light pollution are often combined and overlapping:
  • Urban sky glow—the brightening of the night sky over inhabited areas.
  • Light trespass—light falling where it is not intended, wanted, or needed.
  • Glare— excessive brightness which causes visual discomfort. High levels of glare can decrease visibility.
  • Clutter—bright, confusing, and excessive groupings of light sources, commonly found in over-lit urban areas. The proliferation of clutter contributes to urban sky glow, trespass, and glare.
This map shows the varying degrees of light pollution we face here in the Texas Hill Country:
 
The adverse effects of light pollution extend beyond the study of our night skies. 
 
  • New research suggests that light at night may interfere with normal circadian rhythms—the 24-hour cycle of day and night that humans have used to maintain health and regulate their activities for thousands of years. Light pollution has also been linked to sleep disorders, cancer, and other health issues.
 
  • Wildlife, too, is harmed by the unnecessary brightening of the night. From newly hatched sea turtles to migrating birds, fish, frogs, salamanders, and lighting bugs, artificial night lighting disrupts the cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. While research is still ongoing, it is becoming apparent that both bright days and dark nights are necessary to maintain healthy hormone production, cell function, and brain activity, as well as normal feeding, mating, and migratory behavior for many species.
 
  • Our eyes, when dark-adapted, have good natural capacity in low-light situations. But when nightscapes are over-lit, eyes never have a chance to become dark-adapted, and areas adjacent to brightly lit areas become impenetrable, reducing safety. Some communities have experienced a decrease in crime by reducing or eliminating nighttime lighting in appropriate areas. Over-lighting the night neither improves visibility nor increases nighttime safety, utility, security, or ambiance.
 
  • Light pollution wastes money and energy. Billions of dollars are spent on unnecessary lighting every year in the United States alone, with over $2.2 billion going directly into the nighttime sky via unshielded outdoor lights. The cost jumps to $3 billion (including $250M for Texas) when lost revenues from a decrease in tourism dollars are factored into the equation as well.  Astro Tourism is a rapidly growing industry in the Hill Country (families staying overnight typically spend 3/4 times more than they otherwise would on a day trip), and this is just one more reason we need to work to protect the integrity of our Hill Country skies.    
 
Practical actions we can take to reduce light pollution:
 
  • Use light only when and where it’s needed - Turn off lights when they are not needed and create a curfew for lights-out. Minimize interim light use with timers and motion detectors.
  • Use only as much light as needed. Over lighting reduces the eye’s ability to see outside of the lit area. In addition, excess light can produce glare, which also reduces visibility. Selecting the correct lamp wattage for your needs increases safety and reduces costs.
  • Shine lights down, not up. A well-designed fixture will direct the light where it’s needed most—at the ground. Select new fixtures that are fully shielded; retrofit or replace poor quality fixtures. For more information on selecting dark-sky friendly fixtures, refer to IDA’s Web site and the fixtures featured in the IDA Fixture Seal of Approval program.
  • Use efficient light sources for outdoor lighting around homes and businesses. Consider a compact fluorescent for good, energy efficient, economical lighting—a low-wattage lamp gives plenty of light for most properties and applications, and in a fully shielded fixture, it makes an excellent choice. When higher wattage lamps are necessary, be sure that they are fully shielded and energy efficient.
  • Learn the facts about light pollution - Learn how to recognize fixtures that are well-designed, dark sky friendly and efficient. IDA is the leading authority on the problems and solutions related to light pollution, and IDA’s Web site (www.darksky.org) is a great educational resource.
  • See illustrations below for examples of recommended lighting: 
 
Other ways we can protect our Hill Country Skies:
  • Through Education
    • Star Parties (i.e. Texas Night Sky Festival)
    • Schools (i.e. Schreiner Observatory) & Scouts
    • Public presentations and conferences
  • Night Sky Friendly Business Recognition Programs
  • Resolutions & Ordinances
    • Seven County Resolutions Adopted
      • Bandera, Blanco, Burnet, Kerr, Kimble, Real, Uvalde
    • Twelve Other Outdoor Lighting Ordinances Adopted
      • Blanco, Boerne, Bulverde, Fredericksburg, Llano, Mason, Horseshoe Bay, Johnson City, Kyle, Wimberley, Westlake Hills, San Antonio
  • Donate
    • Established in 1988, the International Dark-Sky Association is an educational, environmental 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to protecting and preserving the nighttime environment and our heritage of dark skies through quality outdoor lighting. With over thousands of members in more than 70 countries, IDA relies on contributions from concerned citizens like you who become members, donate, or make us a part of their planned giving portfolios.
Next Steps for the Kerrville Community:
  •  Deeper Dive & Action Planning Meeting
    • Thursday, January 11th, 7pm at the Riverside Nature Center, 150 Francisco Lemos St.
  • Develop Partnerships
    • Schreiner, Chamber of Commerce, City of Kerrville, KPUB, KISD, Retailers, Builders
Let's come together and protect our night skies!!
 
Rick Assunto kicks off the meeting with prayer and the pledge. 
Sign up for Ringing the Bell to benefit the Salvation Army's programs.  It will be at Gibson's during the holiday season (the 14th and 16th of December). You can sign up online at kerrvillerotary.org, under "Club Events".  We particularly need volunteers for Thursday, December 14. Come support the Salvation Army!
 
The Kerrville Morning Rotary Club will be selling pecans again!  The pecans are Durham pecans from Comanche, Texas & they are delicious!  They will be $13 per bag or $25 for 2 bags.  Checks can be made payable to Kerrville Morning Rotary Club.  Representatives will attend our meetings for the next few weeks to sell their pecans.  You can email Lew at lew@herocardonline.com if you can't make it to a meeting and would like some pecans.  
 
Get ready for the Kerrville Rotary Christmas Party! It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas..... and we are hoping you will celebrate with us!
 
Event:
Kerrville Rotary Christmas Party
 
Date:
Dec 13, 2017 5:30 PM  - Dec 13, 2017 8:00 PM
 
 
 
Location:
Buckhorn Lake Resort
2885 Goat Creek Rd
Kerrville, TX United States
78028
 
Please RSVP (you should have received an email with a Microsoft Outlook calendar link attached) and let us know how many folks are coming with you and if you prefer Prime Rib - cooked medium rare (that is the only choice for preparation) or a Pork Chop.  Our sides this year will be baked potato, a yummy veggie and a salad. We will have cupcakes for dessert and there will be a cash bar for you to enjoy (Wine is $4, domestic beer is $3 and Premium is $4).
 
This year we are not asking for a can of food donation on-site, but we are asking that you either donate an hour of your time to ring the bell for the Salvation Army OR you can bring cash to put in the Salvation Army bucket that evening.  
 
Please RSVP as soon as possible.  Numbers must be turned in no later than December 7th.  THANKS!  
 
Please consider planting a tree to support the goal of 170 new trees for this year. It is a Rotary goal to plant a tree to equal the number of Rotarians in our club. So, if you have a need at your home or business, or know of a church, school, park or other entity that  could use a tree, please contact President Kristy.
 
Jimmy Hutto plants a tree at his house.
 
 
 
Bill & Nancy Muldoon were hard at work planting trees to spruce up the neighborhood!
 
 
A great partnership- Rotary, YMCA Camp Flaming Arrow, Greystone and KPUB! Students from Greystone planting 20 trees here at YMCA Camp Flaming Arrow. 
 
Rotarian Jay Dunnahoo was recently diagnosed with Acute Mylogenous Leukemia.  Please keep Jay and his family in your prayers.
 
Robin Miears son, Hunter, is now engaged to Taylor Sparkman.  The wedding is scheduled for June 2019.  Congratulations to the Miears and Sparkman families!
Rotary Satellite-Minutes             September 19, 2017

 

Call To Order/Welcome Tricia
 
Invocation                         Denise LeMeilleur                                           PLEDGE Tricia Byrom
Introductions    -              Guests-Cynthia McNeely, Kristi Vandenberg (Noon Rotary)
Guests – Pete Calderon and Donna Winstead (pending members) Guest- Rusty Heirholzer
 

 

Program- Rusty Heirholzer
 
Sheriff Hierholzer, "Rusty" to many in the community that know him, is a native Texan that took residence in Kerr County in 1975. He is married with 3 daughters, 1 son. And is a proud grandfather. Sheriff Hierholzer has over 32 years with the Kerr County Sheriff's Department. During his period in law enforcement he has worked as the Criminal Investigator with the 198th District Attorney's Office. During his career with the department over the years he has worked with many sheriffs and in doing so he has served as a Patrol Deputy, Jail Administrator, Instructor, and Chief Criminal Investigator. In April of 2000 he became the Sheriff of Kerr County.
Kerr County Sheriff W.R. “Rusty” Hierholzer shared with Rotary his department currently houses between 85 to 90 inmates in Burnet County, Hierholzer said, “the daily rate for contract prisoners is presently $35 per day with an interlocal agreement between Kerr and Burnet counties. Additionally, the Kerr County Sheriff’s department houses approximately 50 plus prisoners in Bell County, including female inmates.” Hierholzer stated having prisoners in both counties makes for a lot if mileage and keeps employees busy. Sometimes they have two vehicles with prisoners going in two different directions and sometimes more than once a day. His department will transport prisoners for court and then have to take them back. Prisoners can only be held for less than 24 hours and then need to be taken back. He is looking forward to Dec. 22, the projected completion date for the jail expansion project.
When asked about the largest problem in Kerr County outside of the jail housing issue, Hierholzer replied simply “Drugs”. He explained that with the legalization of marijuana in many states, it has changed the type of drug influx coming across the border. It’s no longer simply marijuana. It’s the hard stuff, crystal meth, cocaine, and even a recent spike in PCP and Heroin. Prescription drugs abuse continues to be on the rise, as it is nationwide.
In closing, Mr. Hierholzer indicated he would not be running for re-election this next election cycle. He said he would miss working with his talented crew and the wonderful people of Kerr County but alas, his time has come to slip quietly into retirement.

 

Club Business
  • Upcoming – Pints for Polio (October)
  • Signups for Prayer/Invocation and Refreshments for the year.
 
October  Meetings          10/17/2017 Regular satellite meeting
10/19/2017 Pints for Polio
10/25/2017 Noon Rotary Halloween lunch
 
Closing - Four Way – Tricia Byrom
 Rotary Satellite-Minutes October 17, 2017
Call to Order/Welcome - Tricia Byrom
Invocation Denise LeMeilleur - Rotary prayer eradicating Polio
PLEDGE – Tricia Byrom
Introductions - Guests-Cynthia McNeely, Charlie Given
Program - Erin Mosty Wofford - Rotary Speed Dating
 
At a normal rotary meeting we greet each other and usually ask questions like “How is your day going.” In speed dating we have less than 5 minutes to find out who the person across from is, what they do and why they are in Rotary. Scary, nah, it was actually a lot if fun! Today’s speed Rotary session was so successful; we needed to bring the group back to order as the session ended. It’s not that we can’t ask personal questions during normal Rotary meetings, but it may seem a bit unnatural when it is not moderated. Today’s speed Rotary session highlighted members in short, focused conversations with people that they probably didn’t know well. When the time was up, it was off to the next person and the next conversation. Judging by the buzz in the room and the reluctance of people to stop sharing, many Satellite Rotarians were happy to share and enjoyed the conversation.
New Business –
Induction of two new members
  • Pete Calderon – Kerrville State Hospital
  • Donna Winstead – Nationwide Insurance
 
 
 
Recognition of Perfect Attendance
  • • Tricia Byrom
  • • Courtney Compton
  • • Denise LeMeilleur
 
 
Club Business
Upcoming – Pints for Polio (October 19th Cynthia has wristbands) Pints for Polio – October 19th, Chair Cynthia McNeely and her fellow Rotarians are very busy planning an event that will include participation by four of our local "pubs." Mark your calendar for Thursday, October 19th. Goal is to raise $10K during this event for Polio eradication. For now, ... plan on attending at least one of the following locations from 6pm-9pm: Grape Juice, Pint n' Plow, Wilson's & Azul. Cynthia has wristbands for sale.
Chris Chedzoy and his family are the current host family for our Rotary Exchange student, Javier. Our club is looking for another host family for Javi for the next three to four months, if you are interested and are able to be a host, please contact Janelle Peralt. Many thanks to Chris for hosting.
  • • Signups for Prayer/Invocation and Refreshments for the year.
  • • KSH Christmas Party Dec. 19th 6PM Unit 3-B
  • • Blue Santa Program, sign-up sheet for Volunteers (we need empty paper boxes for turkeys)
 
November Meetings 11/08/2017 Veterans Day Program
11/21/2017 Regular Satellite Meeting
11/22/2017 Kiwanis joint meeting at Kroc Center
Closing - Four Way
 
Contact Us 

Caroline Wilson 
Club Administrator

(512) 787-7964

Mailing Address:

Rotary Club of Kerrville
218 Quinlan St. PMB #561
Kerrville, TX 78028
kerrvillerotary@gmail.com

 

 
Club Events
 
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Club Executives & Directors
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Secretary
Treasurer
Board Member
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Speakers
Holiday Break
Dec 20, 2017
Holiday Break
Dec 27, 2017
Dr Eugene Dowdy
Jan 03, 2018
Symphony of the Hills Presentation
Jeff Anderson
Jan 10, 2018
OLLI
Catherine Mayfield
Jan 17, 2018
Rise Against Hunger
Joyce Bilgrave
Jan 24, 2018
The National Dyslexia Problem
Becky Dinnin, Ex Director, The Alamo Endowment
Jan 31, 2018
Reimagining the Alamo
Gary Foreman, the Alamo Legacy
Feb 07, 2018
Recreating the Alamo, an Alternative View